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Richard Prince

Born in 1949, in the United States 

Lives and works in Rensselaerville (United States of America)

Richard Prince belongs to the generation of American artists who grew up in the 1950s at the time of the explosion of mass media (television, cinema, magazines). 

He appeared on the international scene during the late 1970s alongside Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine and Barbara Kruger, as a major proponent of appropriation art. He deconstructed the mechanisms of representation and communication promoted by American popular culture. In 1977 his practice took a radical turn when he started re-using advertising images, which he photographed and appropriated. Cutting out the text and logo, he reframed the images, creating blurred effects and emphasising colour. Working largely in series, his subjects were models, cowboys and women on motorbikes. Prince turned the cowboy into an emblematic, complex object, expressing nostalgia for a mythical, foundational period while highlighting the stereotype through clichés.

Selected Bibliography

Prince, Richard ; Pontégnie, Anne. Richard Prince, The magic castle. Dijon : Presses du réel, 2013. 

Rubin, Robert M. ; Minssieux-Chamonard, Marie ; Racine, Bruno. Richard Prince à la Bibliothèque nationale de France : American prayer : [exposition, Grande Galerie de la Bibliothèque nationale de France, site François Mitterrand, Paris, du 29 mars au 26 juin 2011]. [Paris] : Bibliothèque nationale de France, 2011. 

Spector, Nancy. Richard Prince : [exhibition, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, September 28, 2007-January 9, 2008 ; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, March 22-June 15, 2008 ; Serpentine Gallery, London, summer 2008]. New York : Guggenheim Museum, 2007. 

Prince, Richard ; Ruf, Beatrix. Richard Prince : Jokes & cartoons. [Zurich] : Jrp/Ringier, 2006. 

Brooks, Rosetta ; Rian, Jeff ; Sante, Luc. Richard Prince. London : Phaidon, 2003. (Contemporary artists). 

***   All materials available at the Documentation Centre of the Fondation  ***

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