Tedi PapavramiRecital - Violin
the 27th of february 2015 at 8:30 pm

© Puzzle Eventainment / Fondation Louis Vuitton
© Photo Gaël Cornier

The Fondation Louis Vuitton is to dedicate an exceptional evening to a monument of the classical repertoire: the six Sonatas and Partitas of J.S.Bach.

Tedi Papavrami will play these complete works in two halves:

6-7 pm: performance with artist's comments of Sonata No. 2 and Partita No. 1

8.30 pm: Sonatas No. 1 and 3 Partitas Nos. 2 and 3

Tedi Papavrami will play the Stradivarius Reynier lent to him by LVMH.

Bach's Six Sonatas and Partitas, a spiritual journey.


In the communist Albania of my youth, Bach was lucky enough to escape censorship.  Or to be more precise, it was his purely instrumental music that was spared. We had Bach without the Passions, Cantatas, Chorales or Masses. As for organs – there were none in the country.  

However, even stripped of his religious dimension, Bach gave us plenty of food for thought.  The invisible weight of his oeuvre was there – albeit unacknowledged by the regime: an immense unfathomable sea, keeping us nourishinged, and profoundly so, via a violin concerto movement here or a Sicilienne or prelude for solo violin there.

I felt this presence even as a child, without ever being able to put my finger on it.  To my mind, an ineffable and never-ending charm seemed to suffuse the pages of the Sonatas and Partitas, which I began to play at the age of eight. Little did I know back then that this music would accompany my entire life, providing comfort, unity and a homeland in a daily reality that was soon to stripped of these qualities.

What I was unaware at the time, and for long time thereafter, was the spiritual journey charted by this series of six Sonatas and Partitas for solo violin. While Bach was certainly a man of faith, he was too subtle and too human to deliver a pre-packaged spiritual message, even if he believed in it. As in the Confessions of St Augustine, this music transports us through all the stages of the passions, fascinations and grievances of humanity, before ultimately attaining a state of constant bliss. The label we attach to this – religious, spiritual or philosophical – hardly matters. From the days of Antiquity to the present, from India to the West, this same journey has been tirelessly mapped out by men of rare distinction.

While we cannot be sure that composers such as Bach or Beethoven reached these supreme levels of fulfilment in their daily lives. it is certain that they attained such heights in their art. Today we are lucky enough to be able to short-circuit the time and effort required to take them in. We can listen in to a specific work and thus access the serenity offered by these fleeting moments of virtue, captured by men of genius.



                                                                                                      Tedi Papavrami, October 2014



Date

Friday 02/27/2015 - 8:30 pm

VENUE

Auditorium

Detailed programme

Sonata No. 2 in A minor, BWV 1003

1. Grave

2. Fuga.

3 Andante

4. Allegro

Partita No.1 in G minor, BWV 1002

1. Allemanda

2. Double

3. Corrente

4. Double

5. Sarabanda

6. Double

7. Tempo di Borea

8. Double

Concert at 8.30 pm

Sonata No 1 in G minor, BWV 1001

1. Adagio

2. Fuga (Allegro)

3. Siciliano

4. Presto

Sonate No 3 in C major, BWV 1005

1. Adagio

2. Fugue (Alla breve)

3. Largo

4. Allegro assai

Partita No 2 in D minor, BWV 1004

1. Allemanda

2. Corrente

3. Sarabanda

4. Giga

5 Allegro



Partita No.3 in E major, BWV 1006

1. Preludio

2. Loure

3. Gavotte en Rondeau

4. Menuet I

5. Menuet II

6. Tempo di Borea

7. Giga



Duration about 1 hour

image

© Gael Cornier

Biography

image

 


Upon arriving in France at a very young age, Tedi Papavrami discovered a country and a culture that were entirely foreign to him. His natural curiosity and need to tame the French language in order to make the country his own, coupled with his profound loneliness in the early days, drove him to devour books – always in French: Stendhal, Proust, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Kafka... His boundless curiosity, coupled with his exacting intellectual and artistic standards – enabling him to rapidly bridge the gap between his homeland and far-flung horizons – helped this rare artist stand out in the musical world.


 


In 2000, after the death of the Albanian translator Jusuf Vrioni,he picked up the torch and carried on the translation of the works of Ismail Kadaré. This venture into the literary world continued in 2013 with the writing of "Fugue pour Violon Seul", published by Robert Laffont. This autobiographical account, which met with universal critical acclaim, tells of his journey from being a child prodigy in Albania to freedom in the West. The instrument which has always been a part of his life was given to him aged five by his father, a brilliant professor. Tedi made rapid progress – three years later he performed Sarasate's Gypsy Airs in concert, accompanied by the Tirana Philemon Orchestra. Aged 11, he performed Paganini's Concerto No.1 with the fearsome pace of an Emile Sauret. The young virtuoso was invited to Paris where he studied under Pierre Amoyal at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Paris. This period was marked by appearances on various television programmes, such as Le Grand Echiquier, as well as a number of concerts.


After garnering several prizes, Tedi embarked on a career as a soloist and chamber musician in the 1990s. As a soloist he worked under conductors such as K. Sanderling, A. Papano, A. Jordan, E. Krivine, M. Honeck, F.X. Roth, Th. Fischer, G. Varga, M. Aeschenbacher... As a chamber musician, he was a member of the Quatuor Schumann, an ensemble that includes a piano, for nine years. He has appeared in concert with partners such as Philippe Bianconi, Nelson Goerner, Maria Joao Pires, Martha Argerich, Garry Hofmann, Marc Coppey, Paul Meyer and Lawrence Power.


Since 2011 he has been working on a project based on Beethoven's Sonatas and Trios with cellist Xavier Phillips and pianist François Frédéric Guy, with whom he regularly performs.
Tedi now lives in Geneva in Switzerland where he has been a violin professor at the HEM since September 2008. He plays on a 1727 Stradivarius, Le Reynier, lent to him by the Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy Group.